Tips on technical writing

Sarabjit Mathon March 24, at 3: It really helped me.

Tips on technical writing

Yet because the spell checker takes care of all the other words you may misspell, learning to use these few words correctly is surely not much of a burden, and is crucial for convincing your readers that you are competent and trustworthy.

Avoid "comprise" Apparently the word " comprise " has now been used incorrectly so many times to mean " compose " that this usage is now becoming acceptable. But it is much safer simply to avoid "comprise" altogether, as anyone who does know what it started out meaning will be annoyed when you use it to mean "compose".

If you take a grammatically correct sentence containing "but" and replace it with "however", or vice versa, the result will almost always be incorrect, mainly because of comma punctuation.

However, I do not like tangerines. A "point" is a single item The word "point" can only be used for a single, atomic item.

Thus it is not appropriate to discuss a "sub-point", "part of a point", the "first half" of a point, etc. Instead use "topic" or "section", etc.

Writing good user stories can be hard, but these ten tips will help you tell powerful stories. The Purdue University Online Writing Lab serves writers from around the world and the Purdue University Writing Lab helps writers on Purdue's campus. Technical writing is like copywriting’s old, boring uncle.. In the communicative garden party that is online content, Copywriting gets everyone a drink and socializes, while Technical Writing runs the grill and feeds all the guests.. Copywriters may think technical writing is simple, but it actually presents a number of challenges unique to the discipline.

Use "a study" or just "research", never "a research". Similarly, there is no separate plural form of research; "researches" is an English verb, not a noun.

Avoid capitalization When in doubt, use lower case. Capitalization is appropriate only for specific, named, individual items or people.

Welcome to grupobittia.com!

For example, capitalize school subjects only when you are referring to a specific course at a specific school: Department of Computer Sciences vs.

When in doubt, use lower case. Avoid contractions Contractions are appropriate only for conversational use and for informal writing, never for technical or formal writing.

Hyphenate phrases only when otherwise ambiguous In English phrases groups of several words forming a unithyphens are used to group pairs of words when the meaning might otherwise be ambiguous. That is, they act like the parentheses in a mathematical expression.

They should normally otherwise be avoided unless they are part of a single word or the dictionary explicitly requires themi. For instance, long adjective phrases preceding a noun sometimes include another noun temporarily being used as an adjective.

Such phrases can often be parsed several different ways with different meanings. For example, the phrase "English language learners" as written means "language learners from England", because, by default, "language" modifies "learners", and "English" modifies "language learners".

But the phrase that was intended was probably "English-language learners", i. Note that there would never be a hyphen if the same phrase were used after the noun it modifies, because in that case there would be absolutely no chance of ambiguity: Note that hyphens are used only in adjective phrases; they are not needed after an adverb and are therefore incorrect.

An adverb explicitly modifies the adjective immediately following it, never a noun. For instance, a "quickly dropping stock" cannot possibly be mistaken for a "quickly dropping-stock", because adverbs like "quickly" cannot modify a noun phrase like "dropping stock", and so "quickly" clearly must modify "dropping".

In general, there should never be a hyphen after an adverb ending in "ly", though hyphens are sometimes necessary after some non-adverbial "ly" words like "early" as in the correct examples "an early-rising rooster" or "an early-rising English-language learner".

You may want to search through your finished document for "ly-"; nearly all examples of those three characters in a row will be mistakes.

Advice for Writing Sentences

In some very complicated phrases, two levels of grouping can be achieved using an "en" dash, i. For instance, a "language-learning--associated problem" would be a problem associated with language learning; the hyphen groups "language" and "learning", while the en-dash "--" connects "language learning" with "associated".

Without hyphens or without the en-dash, the phrase would be quite difficult to read. But in such cases it is often clearer just to reword the sentence to avoid the ambiguity, as in "a problem associated with language learning".Premium templates for Microsoft Word, Excel, Visio and Apple Pages and grupobittia.comsional, customizable and beautifully designed templates ready to download and use.

Blog Post.

Tips on technical writing

NEW: 12 Simple (Business) Writing Exercises. Template of the Day. Technical writing may offer an appendix or a form history, but such documentation is rarely included with emails. Again, everyone is busy, so make it easy for them.

Possessive apostrophes cause more problems than any other punctuation mark. Learn to use them properly and you'll show your mastery of written English. style in technical writing. use of units with numbers. All numerical values that have dimensions must have their units specified.

In general, the units must follow the numerical value every time. However, in a table of numbers, the units may be specified at the top of .

Technical writing is often thought of as a way to communicate complex information in a simple, easy-to-understand, no-frills manner. This does not have to be just for scientific journals. Tips for Good Technical Writing Regardless of the type of document which is written, technical writing requires the writer to follow the properties of knowing their audience, writing in a clear, non-personal style and doing extensive research on the topic.

Writing Tips « Writers Workshop: Writer Resources « The Center for Writing Studies, Illinois